Literary Trips with John Shors

Ever loved a book so much you wished you could talk to the author and dive into its pages? You’re in luck: Boulder author John Shors is taking literary lovers to the settings of his bestselling books, which include Beneath a Marble Sky. “I don’t even know if I can take credit for the idea,” he says, noting that many of his readers wrote to him and said they so loved his books—sweeping historical novels set in far-flung East Asian locales—that they wanted to travel there, but didn’t have the con

AI & Robots on the Rise

When Michael Mozer purchased a late-1800s former schoolhouse in Marshall, he wanted to do something special with it. A professor in the Department of Computer Science and the Institute of Cognitive Science at CU Boulder, Mozer was interested in combining his work with artificial intelligence (AI) with renovating his home. His idea quickly turned into a university research project. He and his students installed 75 sensors, miles of conductors and numerous actuators (controls for lighting, venti

Global Glue Project: Gillian Pierce explores why couples stick together

Gillian Pierce of Lyons is searching for the keys to making love last. In 2011, she and her brother, DJ Pierce—inspired by their great-grandparents’ 75-year marriage—decided that love needed a conservation effort. They launched Global Glue Project and have filmed couples around the world, asking them to share their most intimate stories: how they fell in love, the obstacles they’ve faced and what keeps them together. The interviews are available online at www.globalglueproject.com. We’ve interv

Ospreys are stars of wildlife cams

Some local ospreys are the stars of their own reality shows, courtesy two live-streaming cams. The Valmont Reservoir osprey cam even has its own Facebook page with fans worldwide, says Ryan Prioreschi, wildlife resources coordinator with the city of Boulder. One Texas viewer used her family vacation to visit the ospreys at Longmont’s Boulder County Fairgrounds osprey cam in person, says Nik Brockman, web administrator for Boulder County Parks and Open Space. “Some people pull up the webpage wh

Sustainability tax

In a poll conducted by Talmey-Drake Research and Strategy, Inc., in February and March of this year, 58 percent of voters indicated that they’d likely vote for a sustainability tax if money was spent on assisting local organic farmers. Susie Strife, sustainability coordinator for Boulder County, says that county officials have also surveyed residents multiple times on environmental issues and have found that increasing the amount of food grown locally and organically, preserving agricultural la

To Hear Her Story Told

It’s hard to tell if mother was a cynic or an optimist. When she ran up against some danger, like, say, an excess of chemicals from the run-off of fertilizers and herbicides in the well water we drank all those years, she would shrug and say: “You’ve got to die of something.” Two days after we buried you, we threw away the artifacts of your life: a cache of scarves; rollers bristling with pink pins and gray hair; craft patterns for any occasion; used wrapping paper; poems, jokes and quotes clip

Pueblo Grande Museum Arizona Highways

At first glance, the mound of earth — 30 feet high and as large as a football field — looks inscrutable. When we walk around it, our perspective shifts hundreds of years. Thick adobe and rock walls that once enclosed ceremonial rooms reveal themselves. My husband chases our 2-year-old son to the mound’s top, where the two pause to view the Salt River Valley. Some 700 years ago, you could stand here and monitor the headgates of 10 different canals.

Childish Things

I correspond with some members of a group of people afflicted with PPH. One woman lives on a ranch in some Western state, more than an hour’s drive from a doctor, longer from a hospital. She blew a hole in her heart giving birth. The baby is okay. She barely survived. I think about the baby inside me not having a mother. I am beginning to feel like I know him. He tells me his name is Max; Maximilian August. He likes to swim inside me, like a little fish. He sticks his head, fists and feet in my stomach, most days. At other times, he twirls around like a cat making itself comfortable on my lap. Only he’s inside.
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